N.C. teen’s hanging death ruled a suicide; mother says it was a lynching

Bladenboro, North Carolina (CNN) — Claudia Lacy says she can accept anything: even that her youngest son committed suicide — if it’s proven and explained to her.

However, she says, local and state investigators have done neither to support their theory that Lennon Lacy hanged himself one summer night.

“That’s all I’ve ever asked for: what is due, owed rightfully to me and my family — justice. Prove to me what happened to my child,” Lacy says.

She says she’s long lost confidence in the Bladenboro Police Department and the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.

Now, the FBI is looking into Lacy’s death and the local and state investigations that followed.

Without clear answers, the past few months without him have not been easy.

“I look for him and I don’t see him. I listen for him and I don’t hear him,” Lacy says.

The last time Lacy saw and heard her son was August 28. Lennon, 17, played the lineman position for the West Bladen High School Knights, and was focused on football.

His family says that night, he packed a gym bag, washed his ankle brace and hung it on the clothesline to dry before heading out for an evening walk.

The teen had asthma, his mother says, and a doctor had recommended he exercise outdoors at night when the temperature and humidity dropped. Around 10:30, Lennon left his family’s small apartment and headed down a dirt road.

His family never saw him alive again.

Just before 7:30 the next morning, he was found hanging from the frame of a swing set in the center of a mobile home community. According to medical documents, his body was covered in fire ants.

Lennon’s mother was called to the scene several hours later, after he’d been placed into a body bag.

“It was unreal. It was like a dream. It was like I was not seeing what I was seeing,” Lacy says.

Immediately, Lacy believed her son’s death was the result of some foul play.

“He didn’t do this to himself,” Lacy says.

She believes Lennon was lynched.

“He may have either been strangled somewhere else or been placed there or he was hung there while people were around watching him die,” Lennon’s older brother, Pierre Lacey says.

However, North Carolina’s Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Deborah Radisch declared his death a suicide.

When a state investigator asked Lacy if her son had been depressed recently, she told them he had — because a relative had died recently. The state medical examiner cited that exchange in the autopsy report. Lacy says she did not mean that her son had been suffering from depression.

“When you just lose someone close to you, you’re going to be depressed, upset, in mourning,” Lacy says.

The family says Lennon had not changed his routine and was focused on college and football — and distracted by his girlfriend.

The teen had been dating a 31-year-old white neighbor. The age of consent in North Carolina is 16. Some people in their small, southern town did not like that the two were together. Lacy did not like their drastic age difference.

“I was shocked, disappointed. I also, initially told him how I felt – that I did not approve of it,” Lacy says.

In the wake of his death, some wondered whether Lennon had been killed because he was in an interracial relationship.

A week after Lennon was buried, a local teenager was arrested for defacing his grave.

“There are too many questions and it very well could be a lynching or a staged lynching. We don’t know — but what we do know is there has to be a serious and full investigation of these matters,” says Rev. William Barber, a national board member for the NAACP.

The NAACP hired Florida-based forensic pathologist Christena Roberts to analyze the case and Dr. Radisch’s autopsy, completed for the state.

Roberts’ first concern: basic physics. Lennon was 5-foot-9. The crossbar of the swing set frame he was found hanging from was 7-foot-6, according the NAACP review. With no swings or anything at the scene on which he could have climbed, according the review, it’s unclear how Lennon reached the top.

“His size, his stature does not add up to him being capable of constructing all of this alone – in the dark,” Lennon’s brother says.

According to the 911 recording and the initial police report, a 52-year-old woman got the 207-pound teen down, while she was on the phone with an emergency dispatcher.

“Dr. Radisch also noted that she was not provided with photographs or dimensions of the swing set. Without this information, she would be unable to evaluate the ability to create this scenario,” according to the NAACP review.

Lacy says she told investigators that the belts used to fashion the noose did not belong to Lennon.

“I know every piece and every stitch of clothes this child has — I buy them, I know. Those were not his belts,” Lacy says.

The Bladen County Coroner and Medical Examiner Hubert Kinlaw believed the belts might have been dog leashes.

Radisch thought that “some portion must be missing because there was no secondary cut in either belt. The cut would have been necessary to bring down Lennon’s body,” according the review.

Also, the shoes Lennon was wearing when his body was found were not his, according to his family.

Lennon’s brother says he left home that night wearing size 12 Air Jordan’s. However, he was found wearing size 10.5 Nike Air Force shoes. Those shoes were not with Lennon’s body when he arrived at the state medical examiner’s office, according to the NAACP review.

“He’s going to walk a quarter mile from his house in a pair of shoes that’s two sizes too small after he takes off his new pair of shoes – and this is a 17-year-old black kid with a brand new pair of Jordan’s on. He’s going to take those Jordan’s off and just get rid of them and put on some shoes that’s not his — we don’t know where he got them from, no laces in them — and continue to walk down this dirt road late at night to swing set in the middle of the trailer park and hang himself,” Lacey says.

“How can I believe that,” Lacey added.

There are also questions about who first declared Lennon’s death a suicide.

“Dr. Radisch noted that her determination of (manner of death) in this case as suicide was based on the information she was provided by law enforcement and the local medical examiner. She would have likely called the (manner of death) ‘pending’ while awaiting toxicology and investigation but the (local medical examiner) had already signed the (manner of death) as suicide,” according to the NAACP review.

However, in the summary of the case, written the day Lennon was found, the local medical examiner asked “did he hang self? Will autopsy tell us?” Kinlaw also left the conclusion on the manner of death ‘pending.’

Local police and state investigators declined to speak with CNN. CNN asked to interview Radisch about the statements attributed to her in the NAACP review. Instead, a department spokesperson confirmed the exchanges through a written statement:

“The comments that were released by the NAACP were a synopsis of a professional exchange between the NAACP’s independently-retained forensic pathologist and Dr. Radisch,” according to a spokesperson for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

Lennon’s family believes there was a rush to judgment. And until someone clearly explains and proves how her son died, Lacy says she’ll keep fighting until she gets answers.

“I take it one day at a time. That’s all I can say,” Lacy says.

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I Bet My Life by Imagine Dragons

T2WG Music

Imagine Dragons‘ sophomore album is coming, and if the first single is any indication, the fans the Las Vegas rockers gained from their debut Night Visions will be pleased indeed — one might say they “bet their life” on it.

“I Bet My Life,” the first single from Imagine Dragons’ second album, was released late last night (Oct. 26) to Vevo and YouTube.

The song is full of the bombastic, pounding percussion that typified the four-piece’s biggest hits over the past year or so, from “Radioactive” to “It’s Time.” Couple that with a group chorus meant to be shouted at the top of one’s lungs — likely by fans whenever the band embarks on another tour around the new album’s release.

I know I took the path that you would never want for me / I gave you hell through all the years,” frontman Dan Reynolds sings over a…

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Pink Print by Nicki Minaj

T2WG Music

After months of teasing and at least one false alarm, Nicki Minaj has finally announced the release date for her forthcoming album, The Pinkprint: November 24. So far, Minaj has premiered plenty of new material for her follow-up to 2012’s Pink Friday: Roman Reloded: big-booty anthem “Anaconda”, ballad “Pills N Potions”, as well as “Chi-Raq” and the Soulja Boy-featuring “Yasss Bish!!”. There’s no word yet on a tracklist.

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28 Internet acronyms every parent should know

If you think you are tech savvy all because you know what “LOL” means, let me test your coolness.

Any idea what “IWSN” stands for in Internet slang?

It’s a declarative statement: I want sex now.

If it makes you feel any better, I had no clue, and neither did a number of women I asked about it.

Acronyms are widely popular across the Internet, especially on social media and texting apps, because, in some cases, they offer a shorthand for communication that is meant to be instant.

So “LMK” — let me know — and “WYCM” — will you call me? — are innocent enough.

But the issue, especially for parents, is understanding the slang that could signal some dangerous teen behavior, such as “GNOC,'” which means “get naked on camera.”

And it certainly helps for a parent to know that “PIR” means parent in room, which could mean the teen wants to have a conversation about things that his or her mom and dad might not approve of.

Katie Greer is a national Internet safety expert who has provided Internet and technology safety training to schools, law enforcement agencies and community organizations throughout the country for more than seven years.

She says research shows that a majority of teens believe that their parents are starting to keep tabs on their online and social media lives.

“With that, acronyms can be used by kids to hide certain parts of their conversations from attentive parents,” Greer said. “Acronyms used for this purpose could potentially raise some red flags for parents.”

But parents would drive themselves crazy, she said, if they tried to decode every text, email and post they see their teen sending or receiving.

“I’ve seen some before and it’s like ‘The Da Vinci Code,’ where only the kids hold the true meanings (and most of the time they’re fairly innocuous),” she said.

Still, if parents come across any acronyms they believe could be problematic, they should talk with their kids about them, said Greer.

But how, on earth, is a parent to keep up with all these acronyms, especially since new ones are being introduced every day?

“It’s a lot to keep track of,” Greer said. Parents can always do a Google search if they stumble upon an phrase they aren’t familiar with, but the other option is asking their children, since these phrases can have different meanings for different people.

“Asking kids not only gives you great information, but it shows that you’re paying attention and sparks the conversation around their online behaviors, which is imperative.”

Micky Morrison, a mom of two in Islamorada, Florida, says she finds Internet acronyms “baffling, annoying and hilarious at the same time.”

She’s none too pleased that acronyms like “LOL” and “OMG” are being adopted into conversation, and already told her 12-year-old son — whom she jokingly calls “deprived,” since he does not have a phone yet — that acronym talk is not allowed in her presence.

But the issue really came to a head when her son and his adolescent friends got together and were all “ignoring one another with noses in their phones,” said Morrison, founder of BabyWeightTV.

“I announced my invention of a new acronym: ‘PYFPD.’ Put your freaking phone down.”

LOL!

But back to the serious issue at hand, below are 28 Internet acronyms, which I learned from Greer and other parents I talked with, as well as from sites such as NoSlang.com and NetLingo.com, and from Cool Mom Tech’s 99 acronyms and phrases that every parent should know.

After you read this list, you’ll likely start looking at your teen’s texts in a whole new way.

1. IWSN – I want sex now

2. GNOC – Get naked on camera

3. NIFOC – Naked in front of computer

4. PIR – Parent in room

5 CU46 – See you for sex

6. 53X – Sex

7. 9 – Parent watching

8. 99 – Parent gone

9. 1174 – Party meeting place

10. THOT – That hoe over there

11. CID – Acid (the drug)

12. Broken – Hungover from alcohol

13. 420 – Marijuana

14. POS – Parent over shoulder

15. SUGARPIC – Suggestive or erotic photo

16. KOTL – Kiss on the lips

17. (L)MIRL – Let’s meet in real life

18. PRON – Porn

19. TDTM – Talk dirty to me

20. 8 – Oral sex

21. CD9 – Parents around/Code 9

22. IPN – I’m posting naked

23. LH6 – Let’s have sex

24. WTTP – Want to trade pictures?

25. DOC – Drug of choice

26. TWD – Texting while driving

27. GYPO – Get your pants off

28. KPC– Keeping parents clueless

hope this helps you:)-gigi

Conjoined twins die day after birth at Atlanta hospital :0

Conjoined twins born at an Atlanta hospital have died, their parents said, less than two days after they beat the odds simply by coming into the world. 

Eli and Asa Hamby shared a torso, heart, arms and legs. They had separate spinal columns to support their heads.

Doctors at Atlanta’s Northside Hospital delivered the boys Thursday morning, then transferred them to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, parents Michael and Robin Hamby wrote on their Facebook page, where they posted frequent updates on their boys.

Late Friday, the parents posted a tearful video in which they announced their boys had died that evening.

They fought long and hard,” Michael Hamby said. “They (were) doing real good last night, had no problems other than little breathing problems. … They was holding their own, and early this morning they started to have heart issues.”

He said one side of their heart was beating more quickly than the other and the heart rate reached 300 beats per minute, despite medicine to try to bring it down. Staff then sedated the boys and doctors allowed Robin, still recovering from her cesarean section, to leave her hospital bed to be with them.

“We sang to the boys and prayed over them, and our families got to love on them and tell them how much we love them,” Robin said in the video.

“They took them off the ventilators, and about 45 minutes (later), Eli and Asa went on to sleep, to be with the Lord,” Michael said.

Births of conjoined twins are rare, happening once every 200,000 live births, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. About 40-60% of conjoined twins arrive stillborn, and about 35% survive only one day.

The overall survival rate of conjoined twins is between 5% and 25%.

The Hambys are from near Phenix City, Alabama, and have a daughter, Selah, who is almost 2.

“It’s hard losing two kids at one time,” Michael said. “Even though I only got to be with them a little over 24 hours, it feels like a lifetime. I don’t wish this hurt on anybody.”

Robin called the boys “beautiful” and had said late Thursday they were even offering glimpses of their different personalities. Pictures on Facebook showed the parents beaming as they held their babies, swaddled tightly with hats on their heads.

“They looked so much like Michael. They were just the cutest little things. They were so, so sweet,” Robin said.

The parents said their Christian faith had grown stronger ever since the boys came into their lives.

“I know they’re in heaven and they’re waiting on me,” Michael said. “God is good.”

Said Robin, “God gave us extra time with them that some parents don’t get to have, because a lot of babies are stillborn that are conjoined twins, and we had almost two days.”

sorry its been a while since i last posted been busy but hope you enjoy this hear breaking beautiful story:) i did:)